General Services Administration

The East Bay Regional Park District has filed a request to dismiss its two-year-old lawsuit against the City of Alameda over city leaders' decision to zone property the park district wanted to permit housing, the park district announced Tuesday.

Proponents of a ballot measure that would rezone 3.9 acres of federal property near Crab Cove for park use are crying foul over a city-drafted companion measure that, if enacted, would give the City Council the power to put their initiative on ice.

“We feel it is an attack on our ballot measure,” said Karin Lucas of Friends of Crown Beach, which drafted the zoning measure. Lucas and a leader of one local environmental group said they may sue if the city’s so-called “fiscal responsibility” measure is enacted.

THE STORY: The East Bay Regional Park District and environmentalists are battling to halt plans to develop 48 homes on a 3.9 acre property across the street from Crab Cove, which the federal government is in contract to sell to developer Tim Lewis Communities. So far, two lawsuits have been filed over the property and plans to develop it, and local parks lovers have qualified a measure for the ballot that would prohibit housing development there.

THE STORY: The federal government made a deal to sell homebuilder Tim Lewis Communities a 3.89-acre property on McKay Avenue. But the East Bay Regional Park District – which has sought the property in order to expand Crab Cove, which is across the street – objected, suing the city to try to undo zoning that would permit housing there and rallying parks lovers and the state to its cause. The federal government has also jumped in, suing to take a street from the state that’s needed to move Tim Lewis’s development plans forward.

The federal government plans to sue the state to reclaim ownership of a road that a developer who purchased federal property nearby needs to rekindle its home building plans, according to a letter obtained Monday by The Alamedan.

A group of locals who want Crab Cove to expand on federal property where houses are proposed to be built has submitted language for a proposed ballot measure to the City Clerk.

The group, Friends of Crown Beach, is hoping to gather the 6,000 signatures it needs to put the measure on the November ballot. The initiative, which would change the zoning for the property to open space, was submitted by Doug Siden, a member of the East Bay Regional Park District board; former City Councilwoman Karin Lucas; and resident Wai-Kuan Woo.

Neptune Pointe occupies a relatively small sliver of Alameda, tucked away at the end of a narrow, crumbling lane obscured by a Foster’s Freeze restaurant and a thick row of leafy trees. But the 3.899-acre property sits at the heart of a massive dispute between a trio of public agencies that are warring over its fate.